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Breast Cancer  Support –

Dose-Dense Chemotherapy for Breast Cancer May Impair Lung Function

Carbon monoxide diffusing capacity (DLCO) may be significantly reduced long-term postadjuvant dose-dense chemotherapy (DDC) among patients with breast cancer, according to findings presented at the 2018 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting.

A previous study indicated a reduction in DLCO for patients patients with breast cancer who underwent a DDC regimen consisting of 4 biweekly cycles of doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide.

In a previous study, investigators enrolled 34 patients with breast cancer who underwent a DDC regimen consisting of 4 biweekly cycles of doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide. Patients underwent pulmonary function tests (PFT) at baseline, during, and after completion of DDC; none of the patients had a history of lung disease.  Results showed there was an absolute mean reduction of 16.4% in DLCO, and nearly 62% of patients had a relative decrease of greater than 20% from baseline. Long-term pulmonary and oncologic outcomes, however, were not yet assessable.

For this long-term analysis, 25 of the 34 patients who did not have disease recurrence underwent PFT after median 24 months from DDC administration.

PFT results showed DLCO was significantly reduced (81.9%) compared to baseline mean DLCO (92.0%; P<.001), but was significantly improved compared to PFT measures collected post-DDC (75.6%; P=.003).

Five patients (20%) still had DLCO reduction of greater than 20% from baseline.